How Far Is Indianapolis Speedway From Me? [Expert Guide!]

I live in Indianapolis, Indiana. There are many areas near me that you can visit and explore. However, there are only two places that you must visit if you want to properly understand what it means to be from Indianapolis. Those places are, first, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, and, second, the Old Historic Indianapolis City Cemetery. If you’ve never been there, then this article is for you. Here’s the lowdown on how far the speedway is from where I live.

Overview Of The Speedway

The Indianapolis Motor Speedway is the home of the Indianapolis 500, the greatest automobile race of all time. The Speedway is also the place where you can catch a glimpse of racing greats such as Juan Pablo Montoya, Al Unser, Jr., and more. The Speedway is considered to be one of the six modern-day “Formula 1” tracks in the world. In 2010, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway was rated as the fourth most popular tourist attraction in the city, after White Castle, the Indiana State Fair, and the Country Club of Indianapolis.

The Speedway is located in a rural area near Indianapolis, off the main road that leads to the city. If you reach the corner of 25th Street and Georgetown Road, then you have arrived at the grounds of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. There are no hotels or restaurants nearby, but there is a Walmart and a Kmart Supercenter, with a fast food restaurant and a coffee shop.

The speedway is open daily from 8:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m., except on major holidays. Admission is $12 for adults, $8 for seniors and military personnel, and $5 for children. There is an additional $15 charge for some exhibits, such as the Hall of Fame Historic Racing Museum. Parking is $10 for cars and motorcycles, $8 for buses and trucks, and $5 for historic race vehicles. Day passes are available for $30, which provides access to all the speedway buildings and plazas, as well as the trackside exhibits and the opportunity to walk anywhere on the grounds, except for in front of the grandstands.

The Old Historic Indianapolis City Cemetery

The other place that you must go if you’re from Indianapolis is the Old Historic Indianapolis City Cemetery. The cemetery is the final resting place of many famous and not-so-famous individuals from the city’s past. While some of the graves are hundreds of years old, many of them were just recently dug as the city underwent an urban renewal project in the 1990s.

I’m talking about gravesites such as those of Sarah Hamilton Brown, Louisa Howard Owens, and Mary Phagan, who were killed in the 1881 Garlic Massacre. They lie underneath a simple marble gravestone in the shape of a cross, which is surrounded by an iron fence. The grave markings for each victim are simply their first and last names, with no other markings or text.

The Old City Cemetery is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. It is adjacent to the church of the same name and is close to the historic Newfields School. This location is on the southeast side of the city, near the University of Indianapolis. If you reach the end of University Avenue, then you have arrived at the gates of the Old Historic Indianapolis City Cemetery.

The Distance Between The Two Plazas

If you take a map of Indianapolis and draw a line from the southernmost point on the border of the city, where the airport meets the road that leads to the church, to the northernmost point on the border, you will come up with an imaginary line that separates the two plazas. This line will pass through the middle of the cemetery. That’s a lot of ground to cover!

To figure out the exact distance between the two plazas, start at the southern point where I said to draw a line, and count the number of football fields you pass on your left. When you reach the corner of University Avenue and Monument Street (which is just south of the cemetery), then you will know that you have covered exactly half the distance. At that point, you will know that the speedway is exactly halfway between the two plazas.

When you reach the northernmost point on the border of the city, you will see the Old Historic Indianapolis City Cemetery on your left and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway on your right. The distance from there to the start of the race track is exactly half a football field. This is important to remember if you ever plan on attending a race at the Speedway. Of course, it would be best if you could arrive early and catch a glimpse of one of the greats, such as Juan Pablo Montoya or Al Unser, Jr.

If you’re driving from Indianapolis to the airport, then the shortest route is to take the I-65 northbound, exit 57, and travel one mile to the east on Highway 96. Turn right (east) and travel two miles to the south, where you will find the road that leads to the church and the airport. From there, it’s a straight shot to the terminal. If you’re driving from the airport to Indianapolis, then the shortest route is to take the I-65 southbound, exit 57, and travel one mile to the west on Highway 136. Turn left (west) and travel three-fourths of a mile to the north, where you will find the road that leads to the church and the airport. From there, it’s a straight shot to the terminal.

One more thing about traveling to the airport from Indianapolis: You will arrive at an intersection of four roads, all of which lead to the airport. Here’s a map to help you find your way:

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!