How To Check My Speedway Points? [Expert Review!]

The year is almost over, and it’s time to reflect on how the season went for you and your Formula One team. Did you meet your goals? Did you overcome any challenges? Were there any major surprises?

There are various ways to track your F1 campaign, from watching the highlights on TV to keeping score on a detailed spreadsheet. But, which is the best method?

Let’s have a look at the different ways you can keep score in F1 and which one you should use.

Broadcast Grid

The most convenient way to keep score is via the Race Grid available at all the TV channels. This grid encompasses all the races from the beginning of the season until now and keeps track of your results. It’s easy to use: simply find the result you want in the grid and click on the tiny icon next to the race number to see a replay of that particular race. If you’re logged on to the internet at the same time, you can bring up a live feed of the grid as well.

The downside to this method is that it requires you to be constantly mindful of which race you’re performing in and which one you’ve just watched. Because of this, it’s not the most efficient method for reviewing your entire season. Also, with so much information available on the grid, it can be pretty overwhelming. Finally, it requires you to have a reliable TV channel or online streaming service available at all times so you can access your results. For these reasons, I suggest only using the Race Grid for the first couple of races of the season and then moving to the next method.

F1 Stats

Another simple but very effective way of keeping score is using a Google Docs spreadsheet. Just like with the Race Grid, you can use this method for every race from the beginning of the season until now. You can even download the spreadsheet and keep track of your results offline.

The advantage of using a spreadsheet is that you can sort, filter, and analyze the data however you want, whether it’s by driver, team, or even circuit. This is very useful for reviewing the entire season and gaining insights into any trends or patterns that you may have noticed.

The downside to this method is that it’s not as easy to follow as the other two options and requires more manual input from you. It’s also not as quick to record your results as the other two methods do. For these reasons, I also suggest only using the stats method for the first couple of races of the season and then moving to one of the two other options.

AutoGrid

The next method is AutoGrid, which is a free app available for iOS and Android devices. With AutoGrid, you can download past races from the beginning of the season and follow them live as they happen. This is especially useful for those who missed some or most of the season due to being away on tour or on vacation. You can also follow the season as it unfolds by choosing which race you want to view each weekend (depending on where you are).

The main draw of AutoGrid is that it aggregates the data from various sources such as the official F1 website, individual track websites, and even social media channels. This allows you to easily keep track of your results across all the different platforms and makes it more convenient for you to track your progress throughout the season. It also helps make sure you don’t lose track of any results due to manual input errors. The only downside to this app is that, although it does a good job at keeping track of your results, it doesn’t always give you the most up-to-date information. For this reason, I suggest only using the app for the first couple of races of the season and then moving to one of the other two options.

Scoring Software

The final method I’ll discuss is scoring software, which is basically a standalone tool designed to keep track of your F1 results. The most popular scoring software is Formulator, which is also available as a web app. You can use this method for every race from the beginning of the season until now and sort your results by any criteria you choose. One of the main draws of a scoring tool is that it can organize your data in a way that makes sense to you. This is very useful for those who want to keep track of multiple categories such as wins, pole positions, etc. It also helps with creating and analyzing dashboards, which we’ll discuss in more detail below.

The downside to a scoring tool is that, depending on how you want to use it, it can be a bit complex to set up and use. For this reason, I suggest only using it for the first couple of races and then moving to one of the other two options.

Which One Should You Use?

When it comes to keeping track of your F1 results, there are several options available to you. However, to keep things simple and straightforward, I suggest you use one of the three methods mentioned above. The advantage of this is that it will make sure you don’t get lost in all the numerical analysis and remember to keep things light and fun. If you’re new to the sport, I also suggest you start with one of the three basic methods and then work your way up to more advanced options as you gain experience.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!