Where Is Port Royal Speedway Located? [Ultimate Guide!]

In the heart of the South, the racing circuit at Port Royal is steeped in history. It was originally built in 1906 and named after a French resort. However, as the years passed by, the racing community there felt the urge to change the name and get back to basics. As a result, the circuit was shut down in the ‘70s and lay dormant for nearly 30 years.

In 1994, the people of Port Royal decided to bring back what is now known as the “Home of Hattori Racing”. They acquired a parcel of land that once belonged to New York University and began construction on what is now the largest single-track oval track in North America.

The result is an incredible facility that is both breathtaking and represents the work of many years of hard labor. Today, we’ll reveal the fascinating history of the place that has been the setting of some of motorsports’ most memorable events.

Early Days

The track at Port Royal originally had a surface of packed earth. Because of its size, the organizers decided to add extra lanes and use bricks to create terraces to make the race more comfortable for the drivers. In fact, the bricks were a perfect match for the hot Louisiana sun as they radiated heat like a furnace.

The first race on this site was held in 1936 and was won by Alfredo Piatti in a Maserati. In 1939, the track’s surface changed to concrete after being damaged by heavy rains. The following year, the grandstands were extended, and more seating was provided.

When World War II broke out, the US military took over the site and used it for target practice. This caused a lot of damage to the track, and it wasn’t repaired until after the war. From that point on, the track became known as “The Damnedest Racetrack” due to its tendency to deteriorate rapidly.

The last recorded race at the track was held in 1953, and it was eventually closed down. It remained abandoned for ten years before a group of investors decided to give it a new life as it was felt that the area needed additional housing units.

Racing Revival

After a decade of planning and construction, the track at Port Royal reopened in June 1963 and was initially adopted by the local community as a means of bringing back racing to the area.

The facility was put through its paces quickly, and it wasn’t long before it became one of the region’s premier sporting venues — hosting not only races but also boxing matches and fashion shows. In addition, the “Goldwater Ambush”, an anti-communist rally that was held at the site every November, became an annual event. It continued to grow in popularity, and people began referring to it as “Nashville’s own Disneyland”.

In the ‘70s, the track was purchased by George Hincapie and John Galbreath, who used it as a test-track for their Hincapie Industries. It was here that they developed the “Hincapie Sprint Tank”, a streamlined version of their popular racing vehicle that was faster than most anything else on the track at the time. This made the tank an essential part of any driver’s equipment collection — it was essentially a working vehicle with a paint job!

However, Hincapie and Galbreath were eventually sidelined by disagreements with the board of directors, and in 1981 the track was sold to New York University. It was around this time that the need for speed became obsolete as more efficient and effective forms of transportation became available. However, the tradition of racing at Port Royal continued as the school’s alumni association began holding an annual “Rum and Crab” auto race in the shadow of the old grandstand.

Present Day

The school’s alumni association has kept the tradition alive, holding an annual “Rum and Crab” auto race for the past 30 years. The race, which takes place in the middle of October, is named after a popular mixer at the school that was first served at the track in the ‘70s. It has become such a popular event that a Twitter account was created solely to follow the action — @RumAndCrabRace!

The track continues to attract racers from across the country, with many coming to train at the renowned NASCAR Training Center. It also has become a major stop on the American Classic Car Rally, with famous racers like Steve McQueen and Carroll Shelby appearing at the track in the past.

Along with its world-class training facilities, the track also boasts one of the largest collections of vintage racing cars in the world. Its museum houses over 150 vehicles, most of which are on display for the public to see.

Located in the heart of the South, the track at Port Royal is steeped in history. It was originally built in 1906 and named after a French resort. However, as the years passed by, the racing community there felt the urge to change the name and get back to basics. As a result, the circuit was shut down in the ‘70s and lay dormant for nearly 30 years. In 1994, the people of Port Royal decided to bring back what is now known as the “Home of Hattori Racing”. They acquired a parcel of land that once belonged to New York University and began construction on what is now the largest single-track oval track in North America.

The result is an incredible facility that is both breathtaking and represents the work of many years of hard labor. Today, we’ll reveal the fascinating history of the place that has been the setting of some of motorsports’ most memorable events.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!